Author Topic: starter kits for usb learning and experimenting  (Read 257 times)

DavidHills

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starter kits for usb learning and experimenting
« on: February 19, 2019, 09:56:00 am »
Good Morning

I am currently reading an older edition of "Complete Usb" and want to get a development environment to experiment with, to get some
practical experience with USB technology.

i.e. enumerate the device and do some simple communication with it, perhaps using libusb and c++ in visual studio 2017.

would this be a suitable up to date starting point?

Microchips PIC32 USB Starter Kit III https://www.microchip.com/DevelopmentTools/ProductDetails/dm320003-3



thanks

David


Jan Axelson

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Re: starter kits for usb learning and experimenting
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2019, 10:12:12 am »
Yes, Microchip has extensive USB firmware with example code for different applications.

DavidHills

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Re: starter kits for usb learning and experimenting
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2019, 06:14:15 am »
Thanks Jan for your quick response.

I am self learning USB for a simple marine echo sounder project.
I have a edition 2 of USB Complete, should I get a later addition? do your examples in the latter book use the same hardware/firmware platforms as edition2 ?

Would  you have any comments on pro's and con's between the two development kits below for a beginner learning about USB?(they are about same price)

CYUSB3KIT-003 AN75705 gets you started with the Cypress EZ-USB FX3 USB 3.0 device controller  https://www.cypress.com/part/cyusb3kit-003
and
Microchips PIC32 USB Starter Kit III https://www.microchip.com/DevelopmentTools/ProductDetails/dm320003-3 

thanks again


David



Jan Axelson

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Re: starter kits for usb learning and experimenting
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2019, 12:39:09 pm »
The FX3 series is more powerful, manages more of the USB communications in hardware and via an RTOS, and supports SuperSpeed. John Hyde's SuperSpeed Device Design By Example book would be useful. You can see the first pages on amazon.

Though less powerful, the PIC32 series is fine for many uses and the provided firmware lets you see how the USB communications are being managed. 

I haven't used the development kits so have no comments on those specifically.

Both companies have user forums.

USB Complete Fifth Edition is much more current on both hardware and host software.

http://www.janaxelson.com/usbc.htm