Recent Posts

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1
USB / Re: Question about libusb
« Last post by Jan Axelson on January 17, 2020, 10:51:36 am »
Yes, you will need a different solution to support isochronous previous to Windows 8.1. I would suggest looking into using the USB audio drivers.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/directshow/audio-capture

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/drivers/audio/rendering-and-capturing-audio-content-by-using-the-usbaudio-driver
2
USB / Re: Question about libusb
« Last post by EddieSW on January 17, 2020, 04:14:31 am »
Hi Jan,
  Thanks again. We are evaluating to capture the data from the USB audio device. It should use  isochronous transfers, right?
After I checked the winusb wiki, there a sentence "Doesn't support isochronous transfers prior to Windows 8.1".
So if I want to use ischronous transfer on windows 7. Do we have another solution? It is possible to use the LibUsb and winusb.sys is able to solve this issue?
According to your experience, have you ever handled any projects which need to implement the windows USB driver of the user and kernel space?

thank you in advance,
Eddie
3
USB / Re: Question about libusb
« Last post by Jan Axelson on January 16, 2020, 08:55:09 pm »
Yes, the documentation says

Currently it supports the WinUSB and HID drivers for generic USB device access as well as the libusb-win32 and libusbK drivers.

https://github.com/libusb/libusb/wiki/Windows
4
USB / Re: Question about libusb
« Last post by EddieSW on January 16, 2020, 10:56:25 am »
Hi Jan,
  Thanks, May I learn another question? The LibUsb calls the kernel code (winusb.sys)? Is it correct? Thanks
5
USB / Re: Question about libusb
« Last post by Jan Axelson on January 15, 2020, 04:26:32 pm »
Yes, that is the purpose of LibUsbDotNet.
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USB / Question about libusb
« Last post by EddieSW on January 15, 2020, 01:40:03 am »
Hi Jan,
  May I learn the concept about libusb? After I search and study some articles about USB. I have several noob questions, please guide me.
1). Currently the hierarchy of USB system is listed as below, is it correct?

GUI application <-->WinUSB userspace driver(winusb.dll) <-->winusb kernel driver(winusb.sys) <--> usb interface <--> device usb driver

If we use the LibUSB ,
GUI application <-->LibUsb userspace driver <-->winusb kernel driver(winusb.sys) <--> usb interface <--> device usb driver

2). For LibUsb , there are 2 versions, one is LibUsb , another is LibUsbDotNet
I have downloaded the LibUsb source code from Github and it could be compiled successful and it's fine to run them in windows console. If we want to develop the application tool ( GUI tools or others) by using the Visual Studio C# , should I use the LibUsbDotNet?

thank you in advance
Eddie
7
Parallel Port / Re: USB/parallel bidirectional support
« Last post by Jan Axelson on January 12, 2020, 05:10:31 pm »
Only in the sense of receiving printer status information, in my experience.
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Parallel Port / Re: USB/parallel bidirectional support
« Last post by tango on January 12, 2020, 11:48:49 am »
Thank you for your response. I know about serial and TCP/IP options (e.g. Amiga Explorer), but I am researching the parallel port side, and specifically wanted to learn more about these modern and inexpensive USB-parallel devices, since they claim to be "bidirectional".
9
Parallel Port / Re: USB/parallel bidirectional support
« Last post by Jan Axelson on January 12, 2020, 11:06:01 am »
The USB/parallel-port adapters that I'm aware of are designed for use only with printers. They contain a USB device that converts between the USB and parallel interfaces. The device identifies itself as a printer, so it won't work if attached to another device type.

If the Amiga has a serial port, and if you have Amiga software that can transfer data using that port, you should be able to use a serial-to-USB cable on a PC to receive the data (may require some programming on the PC).
10
Parallel Port / USB/parallel bidirectional support
« Last post by tango on January 11, 2020, 10:54:03 am »
Back in 1998 I had my Amiga connected to the PC via a parallel cable wired like the attached, and I could transfer data. This used to work fine when PCs had "real" parallel ports. I am wondering if this might still be possible (with an old Amiga, still only parallel as "high speed" option), but using these current inexpensive USB-parallel adapters on the PC side, of which you see so many on Amazon, etc. Are they all the same under the hood, or are there some chip or other differences that a worthy of knowledge?

For example, this one claims "Bi-directional parallel interface communication (IEEE 1284)"

I see that most of these devices say they do not even need a driver. I am willing to write some code, but I wonder if Windows 10 supports them in a way that will allow API-level bidirectional I/O?

More importantly, is the hardware on these "adapters" really bidirectional enough to support a Laplink-like data transfer connection, or is that barely enough to detect a "paper out" status?

Thanks!
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